Selling of National Flag on the Streets, How Far Correct ? – “Khushi”

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 India CSR News Network

  • Sentiments of millions of Indians are attached with the national flag of India. Should the national flag be sold on the streets, either by street children or by general shopkeepers? Should the national flag be sold only through Khadi Gram Udyog Kendra, which would also generate ample employment opportunities in rural India?
  • The Supreme Court in 1996 passed a landmark judgement allowing every citizen to fly the national flag with respect, dignity and honour, thus making it a fundamental right. The Union Government approved the recommendations of the inter-ministerial committee headed by P. D. Shenoy and removed the restrictions on the use of the National Flag by all Indian citizens from January 26, 2002.

National Flag has always been a symbol of pride, patriotism and belongingness. Whether it has been pre-independence era or post-independence, a well-laid down decorum has been followed by all Indians across the world. In this the sentiments of solders of India carry a special feeling and the chorus of ‘Jai Hind’ sends a vibration in the entire country making every Indian proud.

Up comes our Independence Day, 15th August, and people start looking for the national flag for hoisting at their houses, offices and even their cars.

“But are people buying these flags out of patriotism or out of mercy on these children? How far this is acceptable?” a question raised by child welfare campaign “Khushi” Child Care Project.

When the traffic light turns red and all vehicles come to a halt, these children rush to the cars and autos while peddling small flags in their hands. These children don’t even know what they are selling. For them, it’s a mere piece of paper with saffron, green and white stripes that would bring them the money at the end of the day.

“Government is doing so much for the deprived children through Anganwadis but the children still remain on the streets begging. Selling the national flag is equivalent to quick money for them. Their parents are seated in shelter and they send their children for only emotional quotient. It has become another method of extracting money from people who get sentimental by seeing the national flag or deprived children.” Says Pavan Kaushik, Founder of Project “Khushi”.

People generally respond by saying that this is a source of income for the kids and we should let them continue selling the national flag. So are we now establishing the fact that child begging is a valid & permissible source of income and we should continue to encourage the increasing number of beggars in the country?” questions Pavan Kaushik. “If we want these children to become assets to the nation, the emotional feeling needs to be curbed for the betterment of these children.”

So where will the common people buy the national flag from? “The best way to get flag without any confusion about colours, sizes, dimensions etc. would be from the government store and nothing better than Khadi Gram Udyog Kendras, says Project Khushi. Even the school teachers can engage the children for making national flag for free distribution in the vicinity. Why do you need to buy them only from the street children?”

The Supreme Court in 1996 passed a landmark judgement allowing every citizen to fly the national flag with respect, dignity and honour, thus making it a fundamental right. The Union Government approved the recommendations of the inter-ministerial committee headed by P. D. Shenoy and removed the restrictions on the use of the National Flag by all Indian citizens from January 26, 2002.

The Flag Code, established in 1950, has been amended after the historic and landmark decision of the Union Cabinet.

The ten rupees from your pocket won’t make much difference to you, but it would make the kid a beggar for life. Do not encourage begging.

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