Home >> Corporate >> Livestock acts as insurance in adverse climatic conditions, Says Dilip Rath
Livestock acts as insurance in adverse climatic conditions, Says Dilip Rath

India CSR News Network

NEW DELHI: While delivering the Keynote address at the 45th Dairy Industry Conference with the theme Climate Change & Dairying organised by the Indian Dairy Association (IDA) on 16 February, 2017, Dilip Rath, Chairman, National Dairy Development Board said that animals are a regular source of cash income and an asset, which can act as an insurance against income shocks of crop failure and natural calamities.

Shri Rath said that there are primarily 3 contributing factors which led to the remarkable growth of Indian dairy sector taking our country from a period of deficit four to five decades ago to one of self-sufficiency now. First is the steady growth in agricultural production which made it possible to make available adequate feed and fodder to the animals. Second is our cross breeding strategy which ensured retention of the climate resilient traits of our native breeds. And above all, thirdly the powerful role played by farmer owned and controlled institutions which provided market access to millions of small holders.

Chairman NDDB said that climate patterns and resource endowments have significant implications for agriculture and livestock since parameters such as temperature, humidity, rainfall affect water and other resources and thereby agriculture and livestock.

The dairy sector is likely to be affected both directly and indirectly by climate change. While stress to animals caused by changes in temperature-humidity index would directly affect milk production and animal reproduction, indirect effects include feed and water availability being impacted by adverse climate events.

Highlighting research findings, Rath informed that stress from heat can cause decline in milk yield in the range of 10 to 30 % in first lactation and 5 to 20 % in second and third lactation, and that both the heat waves and cold waves can cause short to long term cumulative heat effect on milk production in cattle and buffaloes. Heat stress can also impact animal reproduction adversely as levels above the acceptable levels can impact conception rates. Stressful heat can also reduce blood flow to uterine tract and damage developing embryos as well as impact semen quality.

According to Chairman NDDB, climate change can impact the frequency and extent of outbreaks of infectious diseases like FMD and HS as well as cause new transmission modes which can be aided by reduced immunity levels due to inclement conditions. While increased temperatures can increase rate of growth of pathogens outside their host, altered humidity levels can affect those sensitive organisms and changes in wind patterns can affect the spread of diseases. Increased temperatures can result in increased usage of water by animals both for drinking and any usage for cooling the animal.

He said that indigenous breeds have genetic traits that help them to survive with in harsh climates, pursuing breeding policies that encourage an appropriate mix of breeds that can adapt to the region in which they are to be kept, should be the most important element in our adaptation strategy. Under National Dairy Plan (NDP) I – a programme under implementation by NDDB, indigenous breed development programmes for eleven breeds – Kankrej, Rathi, Gir, Sahiwal, Hariana and Tharparkar breeds of cattle and Murrah, Mehsana, Nili Ravi, Jaffarabadi and Pandharpuri breeds of buffaloes are being implemented in their respective native tracts through a scientific selection programme.

Shri Rath informed that the ultimate objective of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. India’s gross emissions of Greenhouse Gases was estimated at 2.136 billion tonnes in CO2 equivalent in 2010, of which the energy sector contributed 71%, industrial product and process use – 8%, agriculture – 18% and waste sector – 3%. After the offset by carbon sink action of forests and croplands, the net emissions is about 1.884 billion tonnes of CO2 equivalent. Of the 0.39 billion tonnes of CO2 equivalent from agriculture in India, about 58% (0.23 billion tonnes) is from enteric fermentation from livestock.

While India’s dairy sector accounts for 18.3% of global milk production, its contribution to GHG emissions is only 14.1 %. Ways in which we can either avoid increasing the emission intensity or reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases are – Improving productivity of our animals, adopting a predominantly crop residue based feeding pattern, adopting a mixed crop livestock production system, encouraging producers to feed a balanced ration and adopt renewable energy in the dairy value chain. NDDB has also been encouraging dairies in the cooperative network to adopt renewable energy.

Rath conveyed that as climate change is a challenge that impacts all of us, our dairy sector must not only evolve adaptation strategies but also help in mitigation by contributing to reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the dairy sector.

the author

India CSR (indiacsr.in) is a news portal in the domain of CSR, live since 2009. India CSR welcomes your stories, comments on issues that interest you, feedback, comments from your side to make it more purposeful and resourceful, will carried in. indiacsr.in is designed, updated and maintained by CSR India Corporate Social Services Pvt Ltd. (CIN: U93000CT2012PTC000120). Contents available at indiacsr.in are non-fiction. Though all efforts have been made to verify the accuracy of the content on this website, the same should not be construed as a statement of law or used for any legal purposes. In case of any ambiguity or doubts, readers are advised to verify with the indiacsr.in and/or source(s). Twiteer: https://twitter.com/INDIACSR. Find updates at https://www.facebook.com/indiacsrnetwork Statement, articles, views and contributions can be sent to editor@indiacsr.in.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Contact

    India CSR News Network

    CSR India Corporate Social Services Pvt Ltd

    CIN: U93000CT2012PTC000120

    Registered Office: House No.222, Krishna Vatika, Boirdadar, Raigarh - 496001 (Chhattisgarh) INDIA

    Mumbai: India CSR, 208, Sangeet Palaza, Marol Naka, Andheri East, Mumbai - 400059

    New Delhi: India CSR, M-65, Panther Lane, GK-1, New Delhi

    M: 91 (0) 99810 99555 (Rusen Kumar)

    E: editor@indiacsr.in (Only editorial)

    E: info@indiacsr.in (Only business proposal)

    W: www.indiacsr.in

  • About Us

    We welcome your feedback, comments, suggestions and ideas. We are also interested in finding new data sources, sponsors for our site and our partner sites, and organizations who would like to work with IndiaCSR to help change the world. The website has been founded by stalwarts from the industry and is growing steadily to become an inspiring network of business people working towards the common goal of sustainability. Mission: Our mission is to support practitioners and organizations in building responsible and sustainable business in India and in this way to contribute to sustainable development of societies at large.
  • Privacy Policy

    What is this Privacy Policy for?

    This privacy policy is for this website and served by IndiaCSR and governs the privacy of its users who choose to use it. The policy sets out the different areas where user privacy is concerned and outlines the obligations & requirements of the users, the website and website owners. Furthermore the way this website processes, stores and protects user data and information will also be detailed within this policy.

    read more..

  • Partner with us

    Whether it’s through our B2B or CSR partnership programs, partnering with India CSR can help you to increase business network, build your brand, and expand your reach worldwide. India CSR has always believed in the advancement of information technology & communication, learning, and education, playing a key role within those knowledge communities for generations.

    read more..

Top